THE ART OF RESISTANCE, HONORING NEW YORK STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL ERIC SCHNEIDERMAN

Join the Long Island Progressive Coalition as we Sip Wine, eat snacks, and enjoy local art work at a Pop-up Art Show

The Art of Resistance

Honoring NYS Attorney General Eric Schneiderman

For Standing up for LGBTQ rights, the Immigrant Community, the Planet and ALL of Us!

Thursday, November 30th, 5:30 to 8pm

Studio 5405 Art Space, 5404 Merrick Road, Massapequa

Individual Tickets $45

Resistance Fight Sponsor $250

Resistance Organizational Sponsor $1000

Resistance Movement Builder Sponsor $2500

A Portion of the proceeds form the Art Show will be donated to the LIPC

lipc.eventbrite.com to purchase tickets

For more information call John at 516-541-1006 x10 or email at john@lipc.org

Co-sponsored by the Research and Education Project of Long Island

 

LIPC Launches Worker Cooperative Initiative with $50,000 Contract

Newsday Article May 3oth 2017:

Babylon IDA awards $50,000 to help grow worker-owned businesses

Updated May 30, 2017 6:00 AM
By Jesse Coburn  jesse.coburn@newsday.com

IDA pic from Newsday

Long Island Progressive Coalition officials, from left, Dan Fingas, Lisa Tyson and John Delaney in the group’s Massapequa headquarters on Thursday, May 25, 2017. The Babylon Industrial Development Agency has awarded $50,000 to the group to help create worker cooperatives in town, officials said. Photo Credit: Johnny Milano

The Babylon Industrial Development Agency will award $50,000 to the Long Island Progressive Coalition for its plan to help create worker cooperatives in Babylon Town, officials said.

The initiative reflects a growing interest nationwide in collectively owned and run companies, experts said, and could help Babylon and other local communities retain existing businesses and foster new ones as well.

“This is really an opportunity to keep these jobs on Long Island,” agency CEO Matthew T. McDonough said. “When a workers cooperative is established, the workers own the business, and it’s staying here.”

The Babylon agency is the first on Long Island to provide funding for the initiative, which the coalition, a nonprofit based in Massapequa, hopes to later expand to the rest of Long Island, according to its director Lisa Tyson.

With the funding, the coalition will seek to help existing businesses transition to collective ownership and budding entrepreneurs start new cooperatives as well, Tyson said.

Workers pooling resources to buy businesses from their owners could help prevent the local economy from contracting in the coming decades as baby boomers retire, Tyson said.

The collective model, in which workers share management responsibilities and profits, may also make it easier for entrepreneurs lacking the credit profiles required for business loans to gain a foothold in the economy, McDonough said.

And “it’s not just about the individual worker-owners that are benefiting, it’s also the community,” said Carmen Huertas-Noble, a professor at the CUNY School of Law who has studied cooperatives.

Co-ops struggle when they lack sufficient startup funding, Huertas-Noble said. But once they clear that hurdle, their profits tend to circulate more locally than those of private businesses, creating “community wealth,” said Huertas-Noble, citing examples in New York City.

The New York City Council devoted $1.2 million in fiscal year 2015 to create the Worker Cooperative Business Development Initiative, which helps existing and would-be co-ops in the five boroughs craft business plans and conduct market research, among other support services, according to a city report.

The Long Island initiative will be led by coalition staffers with help from faculty at the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University and Long Island University, Tyson said.

McDonough said the co-op model could appeal to a range of businesses in Babylon, from commercial bakers to millwork companies and small-scale manufacturers.

The agency and the coalition are finalizing the funding contract, McDonough said. The coalition hopes to begin consulting with local businesses and entrepreneurs on co-ops this summer, Tyson said.

WHERE THE MONEY GOES

Babylon IDA funding breakdown for the Long Island Progressive Coalition worker co-op project:

$15,000 for startup costs

$5,000 for market research

$12,500 to consult with five clients

$12,500 to consult with ten more clients

$5,000 to help establish one cooperative

SAVE THE DATE: April 1, 2017 LIPC Luncheon at Timberpoint Country Club

The Long Island Progressive Coalition invites you to celebrate 38 years of the LIPC. Please join us for lunch at the Timberpoint Country Club, as we celebrate some truly wonderful Long Islanders who have made this a better place to live.

In 2017,  we honor the following progressive Long Islanders:

 

Michele Lynch

Retired SEIU 1199 UHE

Diana Coleman Award for Progressive Leadership

Anthony Speelman

UFCW Local 1500

Bill Pickering Labor Leader Award

Benjetta Miller

AQE Education Leader

Frank Scott Education Award

Elaine Gross

Erase Racism

Long Islander Who Has Made A Difference

David Kapell

Right Track for Long Island Coalition

Long Islander Who Has Made A Difference

Larry Levy

National Center for Suburban Studies at Hofstra University

Long Islander Who Has Made A Difference

Rahsmia Zatar

Strong Youth

Long Islander Who Has Made A Difference

For more information and to register this event please visit us at: lipcluncheon2017.eventbrite.com  or

Luncheon Invite PDF

For further information please  call John at 516-541-1006×10or email at john@lipc.org

 

TPP has been STOPPED Thanks To You All

TPP Pic smaller

As we enter into a holiday weekend that is focused on giving thanks for the people and things that make our lives better, we want to say Thank You to our LIPC members and supporters.

While it’s been a trying time in the 2 weeks since the election we have seen renewed commitment and energy from the LIPC family.  This commitment to justice and willingness to do the hard work of organizing and activism on Long Island is crucial to any and all successes the progressive community has.

One of those BIG successes that has happened since Election Day is the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).  After years of hard work, the TPP has been stopped, knocked out by a mighty coalition of environmental, labor, health and community organizations that included many Long Island groups.

This was an against-the-odds victory in the face of massive corporate support for the TPP, vocal support from the Obama administration, and a real push from the Republican leadership in Congress.  With our efforts we were able to marshal a majority of members of the House of Representatives to block the passage of this catastrophic and dangerous trade bill.  On Long Island, we spent months pressuring Representative Lee Zeldin. Working closely with our labor and environmental allies we participated in a rally outside his office with hundreds of people, as well as a mock funeral for the jobs that the deal would cost. These public actions matched with lobbying and education of Rep Zeldin led to him breaking with party leadership and rejecting TPP.

This victory wouldn’t have happened without all of YOU.  Thank You for being active and vocal members of LIPC.  Thank you for standing up for Long Island and all of its people.  Thank you for willing to take on the important fights, there are many more to come.

This Thanksgiving the LIPC staff and board are thankful for all of YOU!

Stand Up to Trump’s Hateful Agenda!

Pathogue Trump protest photo

The movement to fight Trump’s hateful agenda will take all of us. We need you to sign the pledge against his agenda and indicate what type of actions you are ready to take. An LIPC organizer will be in touch! Let’s get moving.

Will you join us?

We need to stand united against Trump’s racism, sexism, Islamophobia and homophobia. We must stand up to Trump’s plan to destroy our environment, social safety net and public schools. We must stand up to Trump’s economic betrayal that gives to the 1% at the expense of all of us, and stand up for peace, not war.

Sign the Pledge Now to Stand Up to Trump’s Hateful Agenda

LIPC Director Lisa Tyson responds to charges of corruption against Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano and Town of Oyster Bay Supervisor John Venditto

MASSAPEQUA, NY – “How many more elected officials will be indicted before our leaders in the Albany finally take action?” said LIPC Director Lisa Tyson. “The announcement today of the indictments against Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano and Town of Oyster Bay Supervisor John Venditto reveals more of the same pay-to-play culture we saw with the convictions of New York State’s former Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos and former Speaker of the Assembly Sheldon Silver.

We call on every State Senator who has blocked campaign finance reforms and ethics reforms in the past to finally stand up to corruption and restore the confidence of the residents of Long Island. The people of Long Island do not have time for more excuses.

With the election just three weeks away, voters deserve to know where their Senate candidates stand on issues of campaign finance reforms and ethics reforms. Will another year go by with more inaction from the New York State Senate, or will our Senate leaders finally tackle Albany’s culture of corruption?

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Skelos Sentencing Statement

Skelos Sentence

Lisa Tyson, Director of the Long Island Progressive Coalition on Senator Dean Skelos Sentencing

“When it comes to having elected officials who are responsive to the needs of most New Yorkers, Dean Skelos embodies all that’s wrong with Albany. What’s worse than his crimes to enrich himself and his son is the legal bribery that happens every day at the Capitol. When Skelos was head of the Senate Republicans, he set the agenda – an agenda that put CEO and his own personal profits before the needs of ordinary New Yorkers.

As the prosecutor noted his actions have “eroded the public trust.”  The public trust cannot be restored until we have a fair and just election system.  This sentencing should be a clear message to Senator John Flanagan and the Senate that real election reform that takes big money out of politics and provides Long Island voters with the assurance there is transparency and accountability in the system.”

No Room For HATE in Patchogue

patchogue trump protest collage

Yesterday, hundreds of protesters gathered in Patchogue to stand up to Donald Trump and his anti-immigrant hate speech. 

Trump spoke at a GOP fundraiser at the Emporium, on the same street where Marcelo Lucero, an Ecuadorian immigrant was murdered in a hate crime. Trump’s campaign is stirring up the same hate that led to Marcelo’s death and the violence committed against countless immigrants in our Long Island communities.

We came together yesterday to say that there is no room for xenophobia in Patchogue or on Long Island, that we value our diversity, and that we will not tolerate a Presidential candidate who aims to strip away the dignity of our immigrant communities.

We must stand together against the policies and practices that seek to demonize and criminalize immigrants.

Here’s Some Press Coverage From the Protest:

News 12 Coverage

Newsday Coverage

WSHU NPR Coverage

Fios Coverage

MSNBC Coverage

Greater Patchogue Coverage

CBS News Coverage

CNN Coverage

CBS New York Coverage

Patch Coverage

Long Island Report

Long Island Press

Lessons Learned That Will Last a Lifetime

Katt Pic

My name is Katherine, and I am currently an intern at LIPC. I study business management and philosophy at Molloy College, and will be graduating in May. I’ve always been interested in politics, which drove me to seek an internship with the Long Island Progressive Coalition

Throughout my studies, I’ve learned the value of placing people, not profits, at the heart of business. As a future business person, I am proud to be working on the Fight for 15 Campaign, which places people, as well as their dignity and well-being, at the heart of the economy.

Long Island is a great place. We have some of the best beaches, we’re close to New York City, we’re home to the Hamptons, and we have some beautiful state parks. When you’re relaxing on the beach, coming home from a day in the city, or hiking on the North Shore, it can be easy to forget that this is also a place of extreme wealth disparity.   

When I first started at LIPC, I didn’t know much about the Fight for 15 Campaign. However, after being involved in outreach efforts at the local train stations, the various state senators’ offices, and the rally in Albany, I discovered that this is truly the issue of our time, and there are many people devoted to making a change. I never knew that faith groups, unions, and other organizations took such an interest in political issues. The most poignant of these experiences was when we delivered petitions to all of the local senators’ offices with Make the Road NY. I was deeply humbled by the people present from Make The Road, many of whom had given up so much to come to the United States, who had to accept low-wage jobs just to survive, yet who were all still so devoted and optimistic about making life better not only for themselves, but for us all. In Albany, a Honduran woman spoke about having been a lawyer in her home country, but coming here to find that the only job available to her was cleaning. Despite all of the crazy hours she had to work to make ends meet, she still made the time to fight for what she believes in. When the minimum wage increase was passed last week, I thought of these people and how much they stand to gain.

All issues stem from the economy.  When people don’t make a fair living wage, they can’t go out to buy from local small businesses. They can’t take part in the many amenities offered to us on Long Island, and they sometimes have to rely on welfare or other social services. For some, it is a choice between food or rent, electricity or transportation, or childcare and heat. It’s a complex issue that contributes to a lower quality of living for us all. With the increased minimum wage, over 300,000 Long Islanders stand to benefit. Buying power island-wide will increase by $2.5 billion dollars. Most importantly, perhaps people will not have to make the difficult decision of which basic necessity they will be able to afford during any given month.

Pope John Paul II once said, “A society will be judged by how it treats its weakest members.” If we do not fight for fair wages, what does that say about our nation? If we do not treat the economically disenfranchised with dignity and respect through fair wages for all of their hard work, then who are we as people? Further, if we do not stand with those fighting for justice, then who will stand with us when we seek justice someday? I think that the biggest takeaway from my time at LIPC is that fighting for increased rights for all, whether it’s through wages, education, raising the age, or fair elections, is not only something that lasts solely for the duration of a semester, it’s something that lasts for life. I’ve learned that it’s not only a rewarding volunteer opportunity or a resume-builder, but it’s a moral obligation to advocate for those seeking a more just state through any means that I can.  I am honored and grateful to have the opportunity to work on causes that I care about, and to work with such a welcoming and passionate staff!