Archive for the ‘LIPC News’ Category

Newsday Letter to the Editor: Wage board was better option

Friday, August 28th, 2015

In the letter “A $15 solution to stagnant wages” [Aug. 20], some pertinent points were omitted.

I agree with the writer that an increase in the statewide minimum wage for all workers would be preferable. Unfortunately, Republican lawmakers have blocked legislation that would include wage increases statewide.

Read the full article here.

$15 an hour for workers?

Monday, July 6th, 2015

Newsday_15AnHourForWorkers_070515

Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island: Should There Be Limits On Speech?

Tuesday, June 9th, 2015

“Free Speech: Should There be Limits?” is the topic of a panel discussion to be held at the Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island on Sunday, June 21 at 11 am. The Ethical Society is located at 38 Old Country Road in Garden City (at the western end of Old Country Road, between Mineola Boulevard and Herricks Road).

Read the full article here

Garden City News Online: “Ethical Humanist Society to Present Social Justice Leadership Awards”

Friday, May 1st, 2015

The Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island is honoring three Long Islanders for their commitment to the betterment of the world-activist David Sprintzen, journalist Bob Keeler and legislator Michelle Schimel.

On Thursday, May 14, the three will receive the Ethical Society’s Social Justice Leadership Award at a dinner to be held at the Nassau County Bar Association, 15th and West Streets, Mineola at 6 pm.

Read the full article here

Ready For Kindergarten, Ready for College Campaign – Long Islanders Overwhelmingly Want Pre-K for Their Children

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

A newly released poll from the Rauch Foundation’s Long Island Index found that 74 percent of Long Island residents support public funding of Pre-K for all families. Read more about this initiative. 

Message From Our Director: We have lost our Fearless Warrior

Monday, January 12th, 2015

We have lost our fearless warrior.

Yesterday, Diana Coleman LIPC Co-Chair passed away. This is a huge loss for Long Island and for all of us. For decades Diana has fought the hard fight for justice. She was the lead plaintiff forcing Nassau County to redistrict due to the impact on minority communities. She has been a leader in Long Island’s civil rights battle over and over. Just one example is in the Youtube video where she is giving the Republicans a piece of her mind about their unjust redistricting battle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=361TytgYr1c

Diana has been the Co-Chair of LIPC for over a decade and has worked to build the organization and to impact social, economic and racial justice. She was a truly brilliant person who had skills in management, finance and policy. She cannot ever be replaced and the organization owes a huge debt to her.

Diana taught me how to be powerful and how to challenge people, but at the same time how to laugh and be friendly to those people you are challenging. We are all just people and being human comes first.

Diana was also an amazing friend to me and many others. We shared so much about our lives and supported each other. She was one of the best friends I have ever had and I already miss her so much.  She was an amazing listener and would be honest with you when you needed it. I have learned so much from Diana.

                                       Service Details
                                       Funeral Service will be on Saturday, January 17th
                                       Wake: 8am to 10am, Service at 10am 
                                       Good Shepherd Lutheran Church
                                       Corner of Brookside Ave & Centennial Ave.  Roosevelt

As a tribute to Diana, please speak out for justice and make your voice be heard like you see in this video.

Always in Solidarity,

Lisa Tyson

Director

Long Island Progressive Coaltion

Views From 90 Penn: LIPC Gave Me a Voice

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

DeAngelis Photo

 

My name is Bridget D’Angelis and I am currently an intern at Long Island Progressive Coalition. I am a senior at Long Island University and I am a sociology major. Growing up, I constantly changed my mind as to what I wanted to do for a career. But, the one thing I have always been set on is my passion to help people. I have always said I wanted a job where I could make a difference by helping people live better lives. My professor confronted me about this internship, and although I did not know much about the organization, the offer was too good to pass up. I am so glad I got the opportunity to intern here at LIPC.  I learned about the importance of politics, a subject I was never too keen on or paid attention to. There are so many crucial issues on Long Island we need to address such as affordable housing, quality education, minimum wage, and other important matters in our society.

One event that opened my eyes to the reality of education and jobs was the Good Jobs, Good Schools forum that I attended. Quality and equal education is such an essential part of a student’s progression in life. Long Island schools need quality teachers, personalized classes, extended learning time, and other necessary components in order to give students of all races and ethnicities a chance for a promising future. The other pressing issue that I grew passionate for was the minimum wage problem. The minimum wage needs to be increased a significant amount. Community members are struggling to put food on their tables and support their families. No person that works a full time job should live in poverty. It was exciting to see the political candidates relay their positions on the subject matter as well. You always hear about theses issues on the news, but when you witness it first hand and listen to people talking about their struggles, it becomes real.

I believe LIPC will help me in my professional career by that I want to work in the criminal justice/sociology field. I want to work as a counselor or an advisor to people who have issues that need to be addressed. This type of work relates to LIPC in that I would be making a difference in society and creating a greater sustainable living for someone. LIPC looks at the broad spectrum of social inequalities and having a little experience with that will help me focus on the smaller, individual spectrum of social issues.

It was also able to see how the election process played out. I was educated on the candidates and the problems that they wanted to address. These problems were local issues that affect the people of Long Island each and every day. I am very fortunate to have had this new experience here at LIPC. I worked with an amazing and down to earth group of people who are so incredibly passionate and dedicated to their line of work. I felt like I was apart of something, that I was making a difference to society in my own small contribution. LIPC gave me a voice. I could express my thoughts and opinions freely on issues I became very knowledgeable of. I was able to venture out of my bubble and make a difference by trying to help people live better quality lives.

Interns Needed for 2015 at LIPC

Monday, November 17th, 2014

Do you know a bright, young progressive person on Long Island?  Do you know of a college student who wants an internship where they can gain real experience and make a difference?

LIPC needs interns for 2015.

Intern photo

 

Have a passion to help the community and want to get real world experience?

Want to learn how to organize and communicate with Long Island Communities?

Don’t Miss Your Chance to Make a Difference

The Long Island Progressive Coalition is looking for enthusiastic interns, who want to improve the quality of life for all citizens on Long Island.

Become part of a fun, cooperative work environment while earning college credit.

LIPC is a 35-year old, Island-wide, multi-issue, grassroots organization dedicated to promoting sustainable development, revitalizing local communities, enhancing human dignity, creating effective democracy, and achieving economic and social justice.

Join us in fighting for:

• A quality public education system

• Affordable housing- Yes in My Backyard

• Clean Money Clean Elections

• Community empowerment in low income areas

Learn community-organizing skills including:

• Strategy development

• How to use social media in organizing

• How to make community change through electoral campaigns

No prior experience required. Training is provided.

Contact the Dan Fingas our Organizing Director (516) 541-1006 x17 or email dfingas@lipc.org

 Please forward this email along to any interested students you know or contact Dan at dfingas@lipc.org with any names of progressive students who you think would be a match.

Views From 90 Penn: Get Active to Make Change

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

Photo on 9-30-13 at 9.08 AM

My name is Myranda; I am an intern at the Long Island Progressive Coalition (LIPC) during the fall semester of my junior year at LIU Post. I am studying Sociology with a minor in Criminal Justice with the hopes of some day attending Law School. I am truly passionate about the growth and prosperity of human society and truly believe that equality is essential for humanity to survive the ever-changing world we live in. Upon being offered this internship by Dr. Heather Parrott, I was elated to begin working with the organizer’s of LIPC because I knew that we had similar goals for not only society on a grand scale but more specifically the Long Island community.

In the past weeks, I had the opportunity to attend two Good Jobs, Good Schools forums that were open to the community and provided vital and informative knowledge to concerned citizens in struggling Long Island areas. Both forums were non- partisan events hosted by the Long Island Civic Engagement Table, Long Island Wins, and Noticia, where candidates running for office were invited to speak alongside community members who came to share their stories of triumph and struggle. After having made my fair share of phone calls to invite members of the community to these forums, I was quite skeptical of how the turn out for the events would be, considering that many of my phone calls ended with either no one even picking up or a “no” but when I arrived I was pleasantly surprised.  Not only were there more than a dozen participating organizations present, there were also concerned community members who came with questions and wanted to have a voice.

Watching a handful of hardworking community members stand up at the podium with shaky voices and concerned looks on their faces was nothing short of inspiring. It was truly amazing to hear the handful of men and women speak of their struggles and needs for change in the upcoming year as we approach Election Day. Some spoke of a need for a raise in the minimum wage to a working wage because they struggle to feed their families and pay their rent; others spoke of the need for adequate and equal funding throughout all of our schools and some even addressed the issues they face as minority groups trying to make better lives for themselves and receive degrees after graduating from the New York public school system. These speakers were hardworking, concerned, struggling residents who are standing in solidarity to raise awareness for these pressing issues. Witnessing these people speak and hearing of their struggles was genuinely eye opening because while I am aware of the growing difficulties Long Islander’s face as the cost of living continues to rise yet wages have remained the same and state aid in school’s has been cut significantly, witnessing people share the accounts of their struggles first hand really made me realize how pressing these issues are.

As a young woman, working towards a degree in my field and hoping to one day make a difference for well being of the community, the commitment to making progressive changes which will benefit Long Island is something I hold close to my heart. If more people in struggling communities would join together, like the speakers did at these forums I truly believe that Long Island could start to see beneficial, essential changes. We, as individuals cannot continue to put our faith in others to work toward policy changes because one person, or even a small group cannot do it alone, we must all stand up together.

Newsday “Don’t send Croci to State Senate”

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

On the eve of Election Day, some Long Islanders are still trying to be heard. Read more of this article here