Archive for the ‘LIPC News’ Category

Elected Officials to Launch Long Islanders for Paid Family Leave

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

The Long Island Exchange’s article Elected Officials to Launch “Long Islanders for Paid Family Leave”

State, county, and local elected officials to release letters urging Albany to pass paid family leave this session

(Long Island, NY) On Friday, March 4th, elected officials from all levels of government from across Long Island will come to Hempstead to help launch “Long Islanders for Paid Family Leave,” a campaign to urge the state to pass paid family leave this year.

With 6.3 million New Yorkers lacking access to paid leave, these officials will urge Albany to stand with Long Island families and pass landmark paid family leave legislation this year so that no New Yorker has to choose between paying their bills and caring for a newborn child or a loved one.

The event will be hosted at Planned Parenthood of Nassau County (located at 540 Fulton Avenue, Hempstead, NY), an organization that has long fought for women’s health issues, including paid family leave.

Co-sponsoring organizations include: NY Working Families, Planned Parenthood of Nassau County, 1108CWA, 1199SEIU, 32BJSEIU, 338 RWDSU/UFCW, Long Island Progressive Coalition, National Institute for Reproductive Health, New York Civil Liberties Union, and New York Communities for Change.

Click here to read the full article.

Join us on Tuesday, January 19, 2016 with Champions in Fighting Corruption on

Tuesday, December 15th, 2015

The Long Island Progressive Coalition Invites You to a Cocktail Party Honoring

 Champions in Fighting Corruption 

NYS Attorney General Eric Schneiderman

Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas 

Tuesday, January 19th 5:30pm to 8pm
UFCW 1500, 425 Merrick Avenue, Westbury
Individual Tickets $50
Anti Corruption Crusader Sponsorship $1000
Anti Corruption Advocate Sponsorship $250
http://lipcevent.eventbrite.com or call 516-541-1006×10
or mail to LIPC, 90 Pennsylvania Avenue, Massapequa NY 11758

A Winning Formula for LI Democrats

Tuesday, November 24th, 2015

Published by Newsday. Written by Lisa Tyson.
November 23, 2015

It’s going to take a lot more than a stitch in time to save the “Long Island Nine” in the 2016 elections. If the Democratic challengers to these nine Republican state senators who represent the Island follow these three rules, they’ll have a real shot at winning seats and taking back the State Senate majority from Republicans.

First, Democrats need to make Republican corruption central to their campaign themes and commit to fixing the state’s electoral system by promising to support publicly funded elections. This month’s elections for Nassau County district attorney and Oyster Bay supervisor proved voters will stand up against a system that’s based on elected officials being impacted by campaign contributors.

Democrat Madeline Singas’ victory over well-known Republican Hempstead Town Supervisor Kate Murray for Nassau district attorney, and the very slim victory, despite recent scandals in his administration, of Oyster Bay Town Supervisor John Venditto over Democrat John Mangelli are textbook examples of how to run against a corrupt political system and beat the odds.

Next year, Venditto’s son, state Sen. Michael Venditto, is up for re-election with a last name that’s linked to scandal. Will the younger Venditto stand up for real reform, including publicly funded elections, that will stop Albany’s culture of corruption? He hasn’t yet.

Second, challengers need to stand up for the issues that can truly improve voters’ lives, like increasing the minimum wage and making college tuition affordable. After all, it’s the big money interests who fight these policies by heavily contributing to lawmakers.

When it comes to having elected officials who are responsive to the needs of most New Yorkers, state Sen. Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre) embodies all that’s wrong with Albany. What’s worse than his alleged crimes to enrich himself and his son is the legal bribery that happens every day at the Capitol. When Skelos was head of the Senate Republicans, he set the agenda — an agenda that put corporate profits before the needs of ordinary New Yorkers. His pro-fracking, anti-living wage, and even pro-gun positions trace to corporate interests.

Third, candidates need to make sure voters look down the ballot by connecting the major presidential campaign issues like income inequality to state issues like raising the minimum wage. In 2012, President Barack Obama won seven of nine State Senate districts on Long Island. Democrats also have an enrollment advantage in seven of the nine Long Island districts.

In the last presidential election, Obama won the 7th District with 54 percent of the vote. That same year, incumbent Sen. Jack Martins (R-Mineola) won only 52 percent. Democrats will turn out next year because their voting numbers rise in presidential elections. Democratic candidates for State Senate need to get those votes by having meaningful conversations with voters.

The Democratic enrollment advantage on Long Island and across New York gets stronger every year. So far, Senate Republicans have been able to cling to power by scaring voters — saying votes for Democrats will give control of the state to New York City; taking campaign money from big real estate moguls and hedge fund managers; and buying off a few Democrats by giving power to a small group that caucuses with the Republicans.

Next year can be one of change. It can be a historic moment when Democrats vote against corruption — legal and illegal — by demanding their issues come first and that their elected officials are accountable to them.

Lisa Tyson is director of the Long Island Progressive Coalition.

Newsday Letter to the Editor: Wage board was better option

Friday, August 28th, 2015

In the letter “A $15 solution to stagnant wages” [Aug. 20], some pertinent points were omitted.

I agree with the writer that an increase in the statewide minimum wage for all workers would be preferable. Unfortunately, Republican lawmakers have blocked legislation that would include wage increases statewide.

Read the full article here.

$15 an hour for workers?

Monday, July 6th, 2015

Newsday_15AnHourForWorkers_070515

Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island: Should There Be Limits On Speech?

Tuesday, June 9th, 2015

“Free Speech: Should There be Limits?” is the topic of a panel discussion to be held at the Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island on Sunday, June 21 at 11 am. The Ethical Society is located at 38 Old Country Road in Garden City (at the western end of Old Country Road, between Mineola Boulevard and Herricks Road).

Read the full article here

Garden City News Online: “Ethical Humanist Society to Present Social Justice Leadership Awards”

Friday, May 1st, 2015

The Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island is honoring three Long Islanders for their commitment to the betterment of the world-activist David Sprintzen, journalist Bob Keeler and legislator Michelle Schimel.

On Thursday, May 14, the three will receive the Ethical Society’s Social Justice Leadership Award at a dinner to be held at the Nassau County Bar Association, 15th and West Streets, Mineola at 6 pm.

Read the full article here

Ready For Kindergarten, Ready for College Campaign – Long Islanders Overwhelmingly Want Pre-K for Their Children

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

A newly released poll from the Rauch Foundation’s Long Island Index found that 74 percent of Long Island residents support public funding of Pre-K for all families. Read more about this initiative. 

Message From Our Director: We have lost our Fearless Warrior

Monday, January 12th, 2015

We have lost our fearless warrior.

Yesterday, Diana Coleman LIPC Co-Chair passed away. This is a huge loss for Long Island and for all of us. For decades Diana has fought the hard fight for justice. She was the lead plaintiff forcing Nassau County to redistrict due to the impact on minority communities. She has been a leader in Long Island’s civil rights battle over and over. Just one example is in the Youtube video where she is giving the Republicans a piece of her mind about their unjust redistricting battle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=361TytgYr1c

Diana has been the Co-Chair of LIPC for over a decade and has worked to build the organization and to impact social, economic and racial justice. She was a truly brilliant person who had skills in management, finance and policy. She cannot ever be replaced and the organization owes a huge debt to her.

Diana taught me how to be powerful and how to challenge people, but at the same time how to laugh and be friendly to those people you are challenging. We are all just people and being human comes first.

Diana was also an amazing friend to me and many others. We shared so much about our lives and supported each other. She was one of the best friends I have ever had and I already miss her so much.  She was an amazing listener and would be honest with you when you needed it. I have learned so much from Diana.

                                       Service Details
                                       Funeral Service will be on Saturday, January 17th
                                       Wake: 8am to 10am, Service at 10am 
                                       Good Shepherd Lutheran Church
                                       Corner of Brookside Ave & Centennial Ave.  Roosevelt

As a tribute to Diana, please speak out for justice and make your voice be heard like you see in this video.

Always in Solidarity,

Lisa Tyson

Director

Long Island Progressive Coaltion

Views From 90 Penn: LIPC Gave Me a Voice

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

DeAngelis Photo

 

My name is Bridget D’Angelis and I am currently an intern at Long Island Progressive Coalition. I am a senior at Long Island University and I am a sociology major. Growing up, I constantly changed my mind as to what I wanted to do for a career. But, the one thing I have always been set on is my passion to help people. I have always said I wanted a job where I could make a difference by helping people live better lives. My professor confronted me about this internship, and although I did not know much about the organization, the offer was too good to pass up. I am so glad I got the opportunity to intern here at LIPC.  I learned about the importance of politics, a subject I was never too keen on or paid attention to. There are so many crucial issues on Long Island we need to address such as affordable housing, quality education, minimum wage, and other important matters in our society.

One event that opened my eyes to the reality of education and jobs was the Good Jobs, Good Schools forum that I attended. Quality and equal education is such an essential part of a student’s progression in life. Long Island schools need quality teachers, personalized classes, extended learning time, and other necessary components in order to give students of all races and ethnicities a chance for a promising future. The other pressing issue that I grew passionate for was the minimum wage problem. The minimum wage needs to be increased a significant amount. Community members are struggling to put food on their tables and support their families. No person that works a full time job should live in poverty. It was exciting to see the political candidates relay their positions on the subject matter as well. You always hear about theses issues on the news, but when you witness it first hand and listen to people talking about their struggles, it becomes real.

I believe LIPC will help me in my professional career by that I want to work in the criminal justice/sociology field. I want to work as a counselor or an advisor to people who have issues that need to be addressed. This type of work relates to LIPC in that I would be making a difference in society and creating a greater sustainable living for someone. LIPC looks at the broad spectrum of social inequalities and having a little experience with that will help me focus on the smaller, individual spectrum of social issues.

It was also able to see how the election process played out. I was educated on the candidates and the problems that they wanted to address. These problems were local issues that affect the people of Long Island each and every day. I am very fortunate to have had this new experience here at LIPC. I worked with an amazing and down to earth group of people who are so incredibly passionate and dedicated to their line of work. I felt like I was apart of something, that I was making a difference to society in my own small contribution. LIPC gave me a voice. I could express my thoughts and opinions freely on issues I became very knowledgeable of. I was able to venture out of my bubble and make a difference by trying to help people live better quality lives.