Posts Tagged ‘Transit Oriented Development’

Photo Gallery: Town Hall Overflows with (N/Y)IMBYs

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010

By Village Tattler, on September 21st, 2010

(N/Y)IMBYs are easy to tell apart by their signs

Town Hall was filled beyond capacity Tuesday night well before public hearings began at 6pm.  A surly mob outside the door clamored for security to allow them into the meeting.  Studio 54 in the glory days never had so much intensity penned up behind the velvet ropes.  Instead of throbbing music and debauchery, the lucky ones on the inside were treated to a vote on whether to downzone Huntington Station for Transit Oriented Development, a hearing on term limits and lengthy public comments.  The Town Council voted against allowing TOD zoning in the Station and therefore stymied AvalonBay’s efforts to construct a massive 490 unit development south of the tracks in Huntington Station.  Mercifully, Supervisor Frank Petrone moved the vote on TOD ahead of the public commentary.  Once the vote was taken and TOD/Avalon defeated, many of the 102 speakers who had signed up for three minutes at the podium decided to find something else to do.  Photos from the evening follow. 

Lisa Tyson of the Long Island Progressive Coalition expresses her dismay at the outcome of the vote and the tone of the debate

Lisa Tyson of the Long Island Progressive Coalition expresses her dismay at the outcome of the vote and the tone of the debate

Avalon Supporters Speak Out Before Town Board Meeting

Wednesday, September 8th, 2010

YIMBY, LIPC gathered to endorse economic development through AvalonBay in Huntington Station on Tuesday.

A group of close 30 people gathered outside Town Hall on Tuesday prior to the Town Board’s Sept. 7 meeting to announce their endorsement of the Avalon Huntington Station project.

Members of The Long Island Progressive Coalition (LIPC) and The Coalition to Support Avalon Huntington Station spoke positively about the AvalonBay Transit Oriented Development being proposed in Huntington Station along with a small group of Huntington and Huntington Station residents.

“Today we’re here to say we support Avalon Huntington Station,” said Lisa Tyson, Director of the LIPC. “There has been a new coalition formed called the Coalition to Support Avalon Huntington Station – over 25 organizations and growing have joined that coalition.”

Members of the YIMBY (Yes In My Backyard) campaign were on hand for the press conference as well. The YIMBY campaign, a project of the LIPC, is an affordable housing movement across Long Island that mobilizes housing supporters to say “yes” to initiatives that propose good affordable housing projects. The LIPC, the local affiliate of Citizen Action of New York, is a 31-year-old organization dedicated to promoting sustainable development, revitalizing local communities, creating effective democracy, enhancing human dignity, and achieving economic, racial and social justice.

During the Town Hall meeting hundreds of letters were delivered to the Town Board from Huntington Station residents who say they are in support of the development.

“We have talked to many Huntington Station residents who believe that AvalonBay is the type of development that is bringing solutions to the community,” YIMBY organizer Maritza Silva-Farrell said. “Today, we are here to deliver more than 300 handwritten letters from Huntington Station constituents to the Town Board, sending their message, ‘Yes In My Backyard.'”

On top of the members from the YIMBY and LIPC support groups, several members from AvalonBay were also present, including Christopher Capece, the Development Director at AvalonBay.

“Not only have we had a large number of individual supporters and homeowners throughout the township, but we also have a coalition of groups that support us that represents thousands of people and I think that really speaks to the broad support that we have out there,” Capece said. “The press conference today was an example of that. I think it’s great.”

Avalon Huntington Station supporters also responded to false information that the AvalonBay opposition has allegedly distributed in the community.

“For too long Huntington Station has been the sight of far too many of the problems that are facing the Town of Huntington: inadequate police protection, gang violence, and now the closing of the Jack Abrams School,” said Richard Koubek, President of the Huntington Township Housing Coalition. “As a result the people of Huntington Station are afraid, angry, and frustrated due to years of neglect.

Koubek added, “Unfortunately a loud group of anti-AvalonBay people have exploited this situation, nitpicking at the AvalonBay proposal and spreading rumors and misinformation that have driven up the political heat in Huntington Station – this is why the Huntington Township Housing Coalition formed The Coalition to Support Avalon Huntington Station. … As of this morning, we have 26 stakeholder organizations from the Town of Huntington who have stepped forward with formal endorsements of this coalition.”

Opponents to Avalon Huntington Station have cited the re-zoning of the land as the major problem with the proposal. However, AvalonBay officials have said, the only property that would be re-zoned is the 26.2-acre parcel of property where Avalon Huntington Station would be located. The remainder of the half-mile radius would not be re-zoned, according to AvalonBay officials.

But still AvalonBay opponents are not content with the Transit Oriented Development proposal. Jennifer LaVertu of Huntington Station is one of the main opponents of Avalon Huntington Station. As a member of the community, she said she is not happy where the AvalonBay support is coming from.

“The YIMBYs live in Brooklyn and Amityville and Yaphank and want to tell me what to put in my backyard?” LaVertu said. “Who are we kidding here?”

The AvalonBay proposal is the agenda for the Town Board’s Sept. 21 meeting.

“Each Town Board member has to have the courage to rise above the current clamor and to do the right thing for the future of Huntington Station and for the future of all of Huntington,” Koubek said. “AvalonBay is an unprecedented opportunity to pump millions of dollars into the ailing Huntington Station economy. This is a once in a generation opportunity, economic development during the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression.”

Town Board Rebuffs Mayoka’s Call for Moratorium, Will Move Forward with Avalon Vote in Two Weeks

Tuesday, September 7th, 2010

By Rosey Mulderrig, on September 7th, 2010

Tuesday’s Town Board meeting started out with a bang. This was the last meeting before September 21st when Board will vote on whether to downzone 29 acres in Huntington Station for Transit Oriented Development (TOD). If TOD zoning is approved, AvalonBay will have cleared all zoning hurdles and move a step closer to beginning construction of a 490-unit high-density housing development in Huntington Station. If approved as written, high density TOD zoning is also approved for any developer that can assemble a 10-acre parcel of land within half a mile of Huntington Train Station. A group of TOD supporters held a rally in the front of Town Hall while opponents in a car with a bullhorn circled, loudly proclaiming all that they say is wrong with TOD. Among the Supporters who call themselves YIMBY’s (Yes in My Back Yard) were Dee Thompson, President of the NAACP’s Huntington Branch, Richard Koubek, President of the Huntington Township Housing Coalition and Lisa Tyson, Director of the Long Island Progressive Coalition. Ironically, Thompson, Koubek and Tyson do not actually live in Huntington Station, the neighborhood that will have AvalonBay’s development in its backyard if TOD zoning is approved.

The Town Hall meeting was unusually crowded for a 2pm session. It was standing room only with most of the attendees showing up out to support their position on whether or not AvalonBay and TOD is good for Huntington. Resident Chris O’Donnell is so firmly against the development that he says he recently listed his house and will follow through on selling it and moving his child to a new district if TOD is approved.

Lisa Tyson says that Huntington does not need any more single family housing but must move forward with multi-family units to keep up with the times. She says that Long Island needs this TOD and implored the Town Board to approve TOD. She told them that this smart growth development will be their legacy.

Huntington Station residents Emma and Rick Riccardo went door to door with a petition against TOD zoning and found that 99 percent of the roughly 100 neighbors they visited are against the proposed development. Emma says that the schools cannot possibly handle any more students when some are already learning in closets. She has worked in the hospital and says that adding roughly 1,000 more people will stress an already overworked and overwhelmed staff. She also feels that trying to get an ambulance down Park Avenue with the additional cars that TOD will contribute is “an accident waiting to happen.“ She concluded saying “beehives are busy, good and useful but when you disturb them, well, see what you get.”

Huntington Station resident Dan Fucci says that although AvalonBay is powerful and has lots of money behind them, he feels that he and those who oppose the development have “the eye of the tiger and they intend to go the distance and win.” Fucci appealed to the Town Board to stand with the Huntington residents who live the American Way rather than aligning themselves with outside forces.

Alissa Taff commended the Town Board for moving ahead with their consideration of TOD despite threats of litigation it has aroused. Ken Christiansen, founder and director of the Huntington Township Housing Coalition says that it is important to look at the economics of the whole thing. He stated that the development would put spendable dollars on the street, which in turn will bring investors into the area.

Richard Koubek says that AvalonBay will bring $100 million in much needed funds to an economically challenged community. “When completed, AvalonBay will bring 360 families who could earn $120,00 a year with very few school children. With 122 units of affordable workforce housing for families who could earn between $45,000 and $120,000 a year, most of it rental housing, AvalonBay will help stem the flight of young workers and senior citizens who can’t afford“ to live in Huntington.

Huntington Station resident Zoe Taylor is a strong supporter of the development.  Her sons have moved away to lead successful careers and lives in another state. If housing were more affordable, it is possible that they would have remained and made solid contributions to Huntington, she opined

As the debate continued, both sides represented themselves very passionately, albeit the Say No to AvalonBay folks were a bit more boisterous. Councilman Mark Mayoka expressed his concern that the Town needs to focus on ridding the area of escalating crime before it adds high-density housing. He put forth a resolution to place a one-year moratorium on the vote for TOD zoning while the town focuses on fixing the area and investigating the impact the Avalon project will have on Huntington. Mayoka’s resolution was not seconded. Supervisor Petrone reiterated that he is committed to the down zoning vote taking place on September 21st and that is when it will happen.

YIMBY Supporters Rally for Huntington Project

Thursday, July 1st, 2010

By Long Island Press on Jul 1st, 2010

Supporters of a planned affordable housing project rallied outside Huntington Town Hall as a part of the “Yes In My Backyard,” or YIMBY campaign, on Monday evening.

Reverend Paul Ratzlaff of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship (center) of Huntington spoke in support of the Avalon Bay Project

The approximately two dozen people in attendance were there to counter a previous protest of the Avalon Bay Transit Oriented Development project, a 490-unit apartment complex that would be built on an area ¼ mile from the Long Island Rail Road’s Huntington station. Proponents say the proposal is essential to keeping young people and seniors on Long Island while opponents believe it will destroy the community’s quality of life.

The Huntington Town Board will vote on the zoning plan for the Avalon Bay project at their July 6 meeting. The land is currently zoned for single family housing.

“This is a movement to bring the supporters together,” said Maritza Silva, organizer of the YIMBY campaign, a project of the Long Island Progressive Coalition (LIPC), who has collected petitions from supporters. Advocates also have support of the business community.

“Affordable housing is important to the business community,” said Dan Perkins of the Long Island Association as supporters chanted, “Yes in my backyard,” behind him at the rally. He explained how employers cannot find talented and capable employees and hopes projects like Avalon will add new employees to the market.

Richard Koubeck, president of the Huntington Housing Coalition, said: “young professional people we cannot afford to lose.” He added that the most of the housing available to young professional is illegal housing.

Koubeck also addressed residents’ anger over the project. “Avalon Bay at Huntington Station is a rare opportunity to bring both economic growth and affordable housing to a community struggling to revitalize,” he said. “It’s hard to imagine why anyone would oppose this shot in the arm for Huntington Station.”

Residents expressed frustration over the current state of the property where the proposed development would be built and its surrounding area. Ruth-Claire Weintraub, a Huntington resident, said: “This is not a dumping ground, this is my home.”

By Christine Smith