Posts Tagged ‘Transit Oriented District’

Huntington Town Board Sinks AvalonBay Proposal

Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010
By Spencer Rumsey on September 22nd, 2010

 

The Huntington Town Board rejected a rezoning proposal Tuesday night in a 3-2 vote that would have created a “transit-oriented district” to allow a developer, AvalonBay Communities, to build 490 apartment units on 26 acres in Huntington Station.

Avalon Glen Cove North in Glen Cove. The Avalon Bay company wanted to build a similar development in Hungtington Station rejected the zoning needed to move the project forward Tuesday, Sept. 20.

The decision came after months of increasingly heated wrangling as opposition grew to the proposed apartment complex, and the issue became caught up in local town politics. The developer had promised to set aside at least 20 percent of the rentals for affordable housing and provide the Huntington school district with up to $1.5 million in mitigation costs to make up for an anticipated influx of new students. The item on the agenda drew hundreds of people.

Outside Town Hall protesters chanted that AvalonBay, a nationwide builder of high-end developments, was unfair to local builders by using contractors and workers from Connecticut and elsewhere. Inside Town Hall, the corridors were jammed, and voices were loud.

Opponents seemed to outnumber supporters, judging from the proliferation of their printed red-and-white signs proclaiming “Stop AvalonBay and Downsizing Huntington,” their white-washed Burger King crowns stamped with the phrase “Say no to AvalonBay,” and the many blue and red Conservative Society of America T-shirts.

The Town Board room itself was filled to capacity. The local fire marshall wouldn’t even allow AvalonBay’s attorney from the law firm Farrell Fritz to view the proceeding.

Noting the intense atmosphere, Supervisor Frank Petrone said, “Your passion speaks loud and clear.” He added, “This town could be better for all the energy this has produced.”

Councilwoman Glenda Jackson, a Democrat, noted that she’d been “appalled” at some of the “vicious comments” from opponents to the project, which she said were “over the top.”

She said that as a single parent who’d grown up in the town and had lived in Huntington Station, the project would go far in addressing the housing and economic needs of her community. But many of the opponents didn’t agree.

“Ladies and gentlemen,” Petrone said before the vote was cast, “you’ve shown leadership; don’t show dividedness.”

Under the terms of the rezoning proposal, the law needed a super majority to pass.

When Democratic Councilman Mark Cuthbertson followed Republican Councilman Mark Mayoka in opposing the measure, the crowd knew the law was toast.

Democratic Councilwoman Susan Berland, who’s made no secret of her political ambitions (such as for the supervisor job, some say), had previously announced her opposition to the zoning’s high density allowance (18 units per acre).

Cuthbertson cited the school board’s rejection of the Avalon project (after voting in favor of it last year), and said that “without their good faith” he couldn’t go forward.

In the end, two Democrats and one Republican defeated the measure, and only Supervisor Petrone and Councilwoman Jackson, both Democrats, were in favor.

After the vote, Berland told the Press that she still held out hope that AvalonBay would come back to the town with a proposal for much lower density, such as 14.5 units per acre. The site now allows for 109 single-family homes.

AvalonBay had said that without the higher density zoning it wouldn’t develop in Huntington.

Supporters of the project were disappointed, to say the least, but they were not surprised because the town board had been backpedaling for months.

“Their job is to lead,” said Lisa Tyson, executive director of the Long Island Progressive Coalition. “They reacted.”

Crowd rallies for planned housing near mass transit

Monday, June 28th, 2010

Originally published: June 28, 2010 8:22 PM
Updated: June 28, 2010 9:08 PM
By ZEKE MILLER  zeke.miller@newsday.com

More than two dozen people rallied late Monday afternoon to show their support for the proposed 490-unit AvalonBay Transit Oriented District in Huntington Station, a development designed to offer housing near mass transit to people of varying ages and incomes.

The demonstration, organized by the Long Island Progressive Coalition, a community advocacy group, came two weeks after a rally opposing the same development drew nearly 50 people to a Huntington Town Board meeting.

“This is a response to members of this community that are lying about the good this project will bring,” Lisa Tyson, executive director of the progressive coalition, said. “We want the board to know that the public supports this project.”

Holding signs saying “Yes in my Backyard” and shouting “YIMBY,” supporters of the project said it would reduce reliance on cars and bring needed tax and business revenue into the community.

The 26.6-acre site, north of East 5th Street and south of the Long Island Rail Road tracks, is within a quarter mile of the train station.

It is now vacant and zoned for single-family housing.

AvalonBay has proposed building both rental and for-sale units, with at least 25 percent devoted to “workforce housing” for people who work in the area and meet income qualifications.

Plans call for a clubhouse, swimming pool and outdoor play areas in addition to the housing units.

At the rally, David Hanover, a lifelong Huntington resident who is a junior at Cornell University, called for approval of the project so he can live in Huntington after he graduates.

“I want this to remain my backyard,” he said, channeling the LIPC rallying cry.

Ruth-Claire Weintraub, another lifelong resident, said that for years Huntington Station has been a dumping ground for the town.

“It’s not a dumping ground, it’s my home,” she said, “and I want it enhanced by AvalonBay.”

The Town Board must approve rezoning before Avalon Bay can proceed with the project.

Earlier this month the board postponed the vote until July 6.